How to get your kids to read better in the dormitory

Sep 21, 2021 Company

Boston University has announced that it will close dormitories to all students who don’t read a certain amount of text or books.

According to a news release, the dorms will be closed for a minimum of four weeks to address students’ reading levels.

“Students are often expected to read at least 50 percent of the materials they receive, but we found that students may be missing critical information such as the content of the book, when to read, and when to stop,” the school said.

According the school, the decision to close the dormities comes at the urging of parents and the community, who have been concerned about the impact on students. “

This will also provide an opportunity for students to learn more about their reading skills, such as what types of texts they should be reading, and the kinds of books they should read, how to read them, and how to learn how to respond to texts,” the news release said.

According the school, the decision to close the dormities comes at the urging of parents and the community, who have been concerned about the impact on students.

“In recent years, the number of students who had to temporarily leave school to care for an ill parent has increased,” the release said, noting that in the past year, nearly 1,000 students have died at the hands of school officials.

“We understand that there are families in need, and we are committed to making the most of our resources, which are finite,” the statement added.

Students who want to re-book their room will have to submit their transcripts and any other documents needed to ensure they can read.

The move comes after a year of criticism and protest at Boston University and a recent wave of death threats against administrators.

The university said it would close the entire dormitory system after a student, identified as “B.”

B.A., a freshman at the school from suburban Atlanta, posted a picture of the dorm and told the campus that “they were going to take my life away and I would not be here to see it.”

According to The Washington Post, the school also reported a surge in student suicides and assaults over the past few years.

Students also wrote on social media that they had already made plans to take their own lives.

“I just woke up and my whole world is crashing,” said B.A. in a Twitter post.

“The school is telling me to go to the emergency room.

I have to go back to school.”

A petition started by students on the college’s Facebook page called for a “cultural shift” at the university, which is home to more than 2 million students.

The petition was created by students and alumni to pressure the university into reopening dormitries.

It has more than 13,000 supporters on Facebook.

“They should do a cultural shift,” said freshman Emily Hovhannisyan, a sophomore at the college.

“It’s a real shame.

It’s really hard to read in dorms and it makes me feel bad.

“That’s why I’m trying to do something to change that. “

What the students are doing is taking away my ability to read and understand things, which I have the ability to do,” HovHannisyan told The Washington Examiner.

“That’s why I’m trying to do something to change that.

“So if I have a problem with a book, I can just tell them, ‘OK, we’ll have a discussion about that.’ “

At the end of the day, they’re taking away your ability to learn,” she added.

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By admin